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US Flagged Vessels

Save The SS United States

Great Passenger Vessels Built or Registered in the USA since 1819 when the SS Savannah crossed to England.

Click on a painting for ordering information and to view a larger image. Many of these paintings and drawings have been photographed prior to completion to keep your prints recognizeable from fakes and reproductions.

On this page are the prints which help support the non-profit SS United States Conservancy. 10% of the profits from sales of these limited edition collectibles will be donated to the ongoing effort of this organization..

To become a member or plankowner and help save the SS United States go to www.ssunitedstatesconservancy.org

These collectible items are printed on 80 lb. Glossy card stock. Size 11x17. All print sales are kept in a ledger which raise their value. Each one is signed and numbered by the artist by hand.

new_book

"NEW BOOK" SS Republic: US Mail Steamships
First edition copies are in. Order now through Paypal and your copy will be sent within seven days through priority mail.

$58.26

steamship_both

SS Savannah: First Steamship to London
The SS Savannah was the first steamship to cross the Atlantic Ocean. Built in New York by the shipyard of Crockett and Fickett, Captain Moses Rogers chose the vessel while under construction so changes could be made for the installation of an auxiliary steam engine. The Savannah measured in at 320 tons which was not a large ship for the times. Launched August 22, 1818 her 98ft-6in length of hull could have her sitting across the beam of today's passenger liners. Her historic voyage from Savannah, GA to Liverpool, England to St. Petersburg, Russia then back to Savannah and off to Washington, DC was the first ever taken by a vessel with a steam propulsion plant. Though not a commercial success the experiment (as it came to be called) started the world to wondering and dreaming of bigger plans for ocean travel. The Savannah was sold and her steam plant removed. She continued sailing up and down the east coast until wrecked off Fire Island, NY on a stormy night. Her remains have been looked for but not located to date

$31.29

baltic_line

USPS Baltic Collins Line
The Baltic was the fourth vessel launched for the Collins Line.In less than a decade the Collins Line would enter that viscious cycle which ensued when "Speed no matter what the cost" becomes a sole aim of steamship owners. "Click the pic for more info".

$19.50

baltic_cutaway

SS Baltic Cutaway
Painting #2 in the American Steam on the Atlantic series. One of Collins four luxury steamers.

$19.50

baltic_cutaway

SS Baltic Scale Color Plans
Not much exists except for descriptions and dimensions. The vessel was built by the John Brown Shipyard and was probably designed by Mr. Collins and George Steers together. The straight stem and sharp cutwater are a later Steers naval innovation. I have taken descriptions and drawings of similiar large vessels completed at later dates from this shipbuilder and scaled it all to fit into the Baltic. The only hull lines I could find were of the last Collins steamer the Adriatic, a definite George Steers creation, more than likely taken by the British Admiralty when the ship was purchased by an English firm. George Steers worked with half hull models and there is no tangible evidence to support that he designed the first four Collins Line vessels

$23.90

color_plans

SS Baltic Scale Color Plans
Not much exists except for descriptions and dimensions. The vessel was built by the John Brown Shipyard and was probably designed by Mr. Collins and George Steers together. The straight stem and sharp cutwater are a later Steers naval innovation. I have taken descriptions and drawings of similiar large vessels completed at later dates from this shipbuilder and scaled it all to fit into the Baltic. The only hull lines I could find were of the last Collins steamer the Adriatic, a definite George Steers creation, more than likely taken by the British Admiralty when the ship was purchased by an English firm. George Steers worked with half hull models and there is no tangible evidence to support that he designed the first four Collins Line vessels

$23.90

color_plans

SS Ohio American Line
This colored pencil drawing is my first study of these small but fine sister vessels built by the Cramp Shipyard of Pennsylvania. This view shows one alteration in Ohio's upper works during her Transatlantic trade life in the late 1870's. In 1898 she would be transferred to the west coast trade for the Empire Transportation Company in the Nome Alaska service. In 1909 she struck a reef in Millbank sound while sailing for Alaska Lines and was lost in shallow waters within view of passing ships for many decades before being blown out of the channel where she sank deemed a hazard to navigation by the army corp of engineers in the 1940's.

$9.50